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Plant-Based Nacho Burgers with Spicy Mayo

I absolutely love Aldi & I have since I was a wee little thing.

My grandparent’s lived in Franklin, Pennsylvania, and I remember spending countless summers up there. I always looked forward to going to the store where we put a quarter in the cart. My Gramps would search in his pocket for a quarter and occasionally a Luden’s wild cherry lozenge would accompany it.

Aldi has come a long way over the last 20 years and still remains incredibly kind on our grocery budget.

Need a burger to spice up your Labor Day this recipe is it.

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Plant-Based Nacho Burgers

Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Keyword Burgers, grill
Prep Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people

Ingredients

  • 4 Aldi Black Bean Chipotle Veggie Burgers
  • ¼ cup Specially Selected Premium Four Pepper Restaurant Style
  • 4 slices cheese
  • ¼ cup guacamole
  • 8 blue corn tortilla chips
  • 4 Specially Selected Brioche Buns

Spicy Mayo

  • 1/2 cup vegan mayo
  • 1 tablespoon Sriracha

Optional: shredded lettuce, jalapenos, olives, pice de gallo, corn, green onions

    Instructions

    • Cook burgers following package directions.
    • While burgers are cooking, mix together mayo and Sriracha and set aside.
    • Toast buns. Once burgers are done, build sandwich by spreading 1 tablespoon spicy mayo on bottom buns, layer 1 tablespoon guacamole, patty, two tortilla chips, a slice of cheese, and 1 tablespoon salsa.

    Notes

    Save extra spicy mayo in fridge for up to 3 weeks.

    Salted Caramel Cold Brew Martini with Salted Cold Foam

    I saw one of my college teammates this past weekend for the first time in over a year.  Somehow, through my online presence they were convinced I had my own cooking show. 

    As we both got a good laugh out of that idea, and I may have secretly added that to my bucket list.

    While I promise there is no cooking show in the works, I’ll re-share this Salted Caramel Cold Brew Martini with Salted Cold Foam while I keep adding to my list of career goals. 

    This drink was a hit during the sub-zero temperatures we had earlier this year. I’m bringing it back and crossing my fingers for even a tad breeze at this point in July.  Speaking of July, can you believe the year is more than halfway over? Neither can I.

    Cozy up with this perfect blend of caramel-y creamy goodness. You won’t be disappointed.

    Print

    Salted Caramel Cold Brew Martini with Salted Cold Foam

    Course Drinks
    Keyword cocktail, Coffee, Cold Foam
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Servings 3 drinks

    Ingredients

    • 4 oz cold brew coffee⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • 4 oz caramel flavored vodka⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • 4 oz coffee-flavored liqueur⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • 2 oz of milk*⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • A pinch of salt⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • salted caramel sugar

    Instructions

    • Pour salted caramel sugar on a small saucer, plate, or rimming dish. Moistening the rim of glass with water or vodka then turn the glass upside down, dip, and slowly twist. Set aside.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • Pour the cold brew, vodka, and coffee liqueur into a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into the martini glasses. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    • In a separate glass, add milk and a pinch of salt to milk. Use a frother, hand frother, or blender until foam is thick and creamy. Spoon the salted cream cold foam over top of cold brew martini.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

    Notes

    *If choosing plant-based milk choose a barista blend.

    How to Pass Your RD Exam on the First Attempt

    I hope you were able to catch my IG Live. As promised, I wanted to talk about how to pass the RD Exam on the first attempt.

    According to the Academy, in 2020, 67.3% of dietitians passed their RD Exam on their first attempt. Before you get too caught up in the statistics remember, you aren’t playing the odds. You are a willing participant in the outcome of passing the RD exam. You CAN pass the test on your first attempt! While much of the exam is about understanding and knowing the material, knowing how to take a standardized test is equally as important!

    The RD exam is a challenging exam, but so was your DPD-program, Dietetic Internship, biochem, organic, food science, food law, and life in the COVID-era. You can do this! I promise. You have and you will do harder things.

    The questions are not there to trick you. The exam tests your attention to detail, ability to assess the most important information given, and critical thinking. My hope is that these tips will not only help you prepare for your RD exam in the best way possible but also help you go into your exam with a sound mind and confidence that you deserve to and can pass this exam!

    Are you seeing a trend? You can pass your RD Exam on the first attempt!

    Peep this tweet from 8 years ago when was still in my DTR program.

    How to Pass Your RD Exam on the First Attempt

    Narrow Down Your Study Resources

    I passed the RD exam after studying consistently for about 8 weeks using primarily Jean Inman, Visual Veggies, and Pocket Prep.

    This leads me to my first bit of advice- narrow down your study resources.

    My internship program provided each intern with Jean Inman. Due to campus restrictions during COVID, I purchased Visual Veggies software on my computer. I also purchased Pocket Prep app on my phone. Each has its strengths and weaknesses.

    Jean Inman walks you through each domain. I could listen to the USB in my car. I downloaded the audio to my phone so that I could listen to it at the gym or on walks. Jean Inman covers each domain while noting key topics.

    Visual Veggies software helped me track my progress over time. I loved the whiteboard videos and rationales provided for answer choices. I also liked the ability to take full practice exams that simulated the RD Exam. That helped me get into the right frame of mind while studying.

    I love Pocket Prep because I was able to take it with me everywhere. I would answer questions while waiting to get my oil changed, on an airplane, or just on the go. Similar to Visual Veggies, Pocket Prep provided rationale and references to find follow-up information.

    While resources named above were my main, everyday resources, I still found it useful to check into study groups on FB, study groups with NOBIDAN, and my weekly study group with those from my cohort. Additional supplemental study resources included Chomping Down the Dietetics Exam Podcast and occasionally YouTube videos.

    The key point is to find what works for you based on your budget, your style of learning, and the amount of time you have to study.

    Create a Realistic Study Schedule

    During this season of my life, I was incredibly fortunate I was able to focus solely on school and not have to juggle work at the same time. I feel for those of you on the grind! It’s not easy, I know! I realize this is a privilege and was largely how I was able to study.

    This is the time, you need to sit down and be honest with yourself about how long and when you will be able to study. I initially wanted to dedicate 8-10 weeks to study. For the first 3 weeks, I studied for about 15-25 hours a week. After this week, I assessed my progress (motivation and concentration) and reduced my study time to no more than 20 hours per week (4 hours a day).

    Can you study 5 hours a week? Great! 20 hours? Awesome! Make your schedule realistic to your season of life, because my schedule may not be realistic for individuals who are working, juggling family, and other responsibilities. Self-care during this time (in the form of eating well and resting) is equally, if not more, important than getting the study time in. 

    This is where I want to “note” (Jean Inman voice), CHECK IN WITH YOURSELF, and adjust your schedule accordingly. As you approach your exam date, your studying will probably begin to taper.

    Schedule Your RD Exam (you can always change your date)

    Unpopular opinion: Don’t line up your dream job with the RD Exam hanging over your head.

    Congratulations! Schedule your exam.

    You don’t have a job lined up? One will come, schedule your exam!

    If your goal were to run a marathon, wouldn’t you schedule your race before putting in all the training? That’s the only example I got. You’re not Forrest Gump. You have motivation. Schedule your RD Exam! (And then watch Forrest Gump, if you haven’t already).

    Treat Practice Tests as Study Material

    Memorizing answers will not do you any favors. I’ve heard many people say things along the lines of, “I only got 2 questions from Jean Inman on my RD Exam.” Quite honestly, I couldn’t tell you if any question I studied was actually on my RD Exam, and here’s why:

    Aside from my weekly full-length practice test on Visual Veggies, I made a spreadsheet and started adding questions from my practice tests. Then, I looked up the rationale for every answer- even the wrong answers.

    This forced me not to memorize answers. This also forced me to know what EVERY answer meant so I could get future questions correct. While this is incredibly time-consuming, it was a lifesaver. After answering the question correctly, I would then rephrase the questions by adding the word “not,”  “most,” or “least” to see how other answers could be correct if asked a different way.

    Manage Stressors

    You need to find a way to manage stressors. For me, planning meals was a point of stress. The time it was taking to plan meals, go to the store, and cook was valuable time I could be use to study but was not all that enjoyable as I was studying all this stuff. With great advice from my friend, Dawn, I decided it was a good time to try out a meal delivery service and not think about meals for a little while.  I know this may not be an option for everyone, I would just say, this is the time to take advantage of people offering to help. Whether it’s running an errand for you, cooking dinner, or babysitting the kids for a little bit, TAKE UP THE OFFER.

    Write Down Affirmations

    I know this seems cheesy and unnatural, especially if you’re not used to being your biggest supporter. I wrote a list of seven affirmations on my whiteboard, which I read EVERY DAY before I studied. I mean, EVERY DAY! 

    When writing affirmations, I think it’s important to remember why. Your “why” comes from looking at past experiences, not future ones. With the exception of #3, my affirmations were written based on my journey to this point. If you don’t have affirmations, borrow mine. Write them down on a whiteboard or on your phone. Just be sure to look at them daily.

    1. I am a dietitian
    2. I know this information
    3. I will pass my RD Exam on the first attempt
    4. I am intelligent & capable
    5. I am determined
    6. I have done harder things
    7. I deserve this

    Take Breaks and Get Some Fresh Air

    You can’t be all work and no play. But, also don’t be all play and no work. Take breaks that don’t involve studying. Go for walks or runs. Meet a friend for coffee. Listen to music! I made an awesome playlist if you need a break to bake cookies! Find a way to be human. Get some sunlight, you won’t regret it.

    Nourish Yourself Kindly

    I don’t want to hurt your feelings; coffee is not a meal. We both know this. We know food can serve two functions: nourishment and pleasure. We need food for both. Don’t forget to choose foods that provide enough nourishment to be able to study and function with clarity. Don’t let yourself get too hungry during your sessions. When your body feels nourished, you will be able to concentrate.

    Trust Your Gut

    Unless you know with ABSOLUTE certainty your first answer is wrong, trust your gut. Don’t change your answer. The majority of the time when you change your answer, you were right the first time. I STRUGGLED HARD WITH THIS taking practice exams, then I had to stop. You know this information, trust you know it.

    BELIEVE YOU WILL PASS! (I changed CAN to WILL)

    On exam day, you’ve done everything you can do, you just have to show up. Yes, there may be topics you didn’t cover or things you still don’t quite understand, you are still more than prepared for this exam.

    This is not the time to cram. You pose more of a risk of misremembering. Wake up (or sleep in), enjoy your first meal, go get your nails done, or treat yourself to your favorite lunch spot. You’ve made it! Today is the day you get to become a Registered Dietitian! Be sure to nourish yourself appropriately before your test.

    Before you answer your first question, close your eyes and take a few deep breaths, and say to yourself, “I’m here. I’ve studied. I know this. I am smart. I’m going to be a Registered Dietitian today.”

    There may be questions you don’t even know where to start. Make sure to read the complete question. Then, read it again. Write down keywords such as most, least, best, effective, etc. Look at the action verb in the answer choices- more often than not, dietitians will make decisions that offer the least amount of risk and requires us to EVALUATE and ASSESS the situation.

    If you still are struggling with narrowing down answers, take your best guess. I decided ahead of time, that if I came to this point, my answer was going to be ‘D’ every time unless I was certain ‘D’ was not right. Choose an answer and let it go. Don’t dwell on it. 

    At the end of the day, the RD Exam is just that, an exam. Yes, it’s important, however, it will always be there. 

    I wish you the best of luck and I know you got this! Message me if you have questions.

    Planted-Based Chocolate Mousse

    Today, I want to introduce you to this delicious Plant-Based Chocolate Mousse made with tofu. Why? Honestly, I think this might be tofu’s biggest flex. Tofu can literally replace eggs in scrambles and chicken in my favorite Asian dishes and now chocolate mousse!

    Tofu is an incredibly versatile food. It takes up the favor of your seasonings and added flavors.

    If you haven’t tried tofu yet, this mousse can be your gateway introduction to it.

    The blended tofu provides a creamy and airy base.

    Tofu is commonly a point of debate whether it’s the GMOs or the estrogen. Research has so far not found GMOs to be harmful to human health.

    If you’re worried about GMOs, there are non-GMO tofu brands.

    Soy contributing to feminizing in men is another myth that has been debunked but continues to circulate within the interwebs.

    Tofu is a high-protein food that contains all of the essential amino acids. This makes soy one of the only plant sources that are a complete protein. It also provides fats, carbs, and a variety of vitamins and minerals.

    Okay, enough talk, grab a block of tofu, and whip this up for dessert this evening.

    Print

    Plant-Based Chocolate Mousse with Berries

    Course Dessert
    Prep Time 1 hour 30 minutes
    Servings 8

    Equipment

    • Microwave
    • Blender

    Ingredients

    • 8 ounce tofu, drained
    • ¾ cup semi-sweet mini chocolate chips
    • 3 tablespoons milk of your choice
    • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
    • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • ½ cup fresh berries
    • Fresh mint, whipped cream (optional)

    Instructions

    • Place the tofu in a blender or food processor. Blend until crumbly. Set aside.
    • In a microwave-safe glass bowl, add the chocolate chips, milk, and cocoa powder.
    • Microwave in 30 seconds intervals, stirring in between each until the chocolate is melted (about 1½-2 minutes total)
    • Add the melted chocolate mixture, maple syrup, vanilla, and cinnamon to the tofu in the blender, blend until smooth and small air bubbles form, about 1-2 minutes.
    • Refridgerate mousse in an airtight container for 1-hour.
    • Serve with fresh berries and mint.

    Second Career Dietitians

    I personally believe, second career dietitians have an advantage over those who go the more traditional route. Second career dietitians clearly know what they want because transitioning to the field of dietetics is not for the faint of heart. Pursuing this career requires a lot of resources including time and money (and sometimes lots of it).

    Each job I’ve held prior to pursuing my RD credentials has been valuable and I don’t discount any of those experiences. Each offers a story in addition to invaluable skills that make me a well-rounded dietitian.

    Jobs I Had Before Becoming a Registered Dietitian

    Payroll Specialist

    As a payroll specialist, I learned how to use software programs to analyze, reconcile, and calculate financial data. I also learned a lot about great and not-so-great leadership in this role. I processed payroll for clients across several industries, so I learned about shift differential, FTEs*, hourly wages, and quarterly taxes (*on the RD exam).

    This job required a tremendous amount of integrity, attention to detail, and dependability working with individuals and companies’ financial and banking information. Also, working on banking holidays, whew.

    Transferable Skills for a Dietitian: Active Listening, Critical Thinking, Mathematics, Monitoring, Time Management

    Coffeeshop Supervisor

    I didn’t just prepare drinks and pastries, but I was also responsible for store operations, delegating employee responsibilities, and training baristas as needed. Working in a fast-paced environment teaches you to think quickly and under pressure. Positions such as this require exceptional customer service and management skills* and a lot of human skills* – from mediating coworker disputes to de-escalating angry customers. I DID IT ALL! (*on the RD Exam)

    Transferable Skills for a Dietitian: Judgment and Decision Making, Management of Financial Resources and Inventory Control, Food Safety and Sanitation

    Peace Corps Volunteer

    As a Peace Corps Volunteer, I spent the majority of my time working in the community with specific target populations. I had to integrate with my community in order to promote and improve community health programs. Cultural competency* was imperative as a Peace Corps Volunteer, it’s also imperative as a healthcare provider as our communities become more diverse.

    Transferable Skills for a Dietitian: Active Learning, Complex Problem Solving, Coordination, Learning a New Language, Program Evaluation, Planning, Community Outreach

    Online English Teacher

    During grad school, I taught English online for about a year. I worked with students ages 4-14 years old. Most of my students lived in China. Working with children requires an additional layer of patience and support, in order to encourage, motivate, and build confidence. The job required me to provide daily feedback on student results and progress.

    Transferable Skills for a Dietitian: Instructing, Adapting Learning Strategies, Social Perceptiveness, Writing

    Registered Dietitians come from all walks of life. I’ve known for a while that I wanted to be a nutrition entrepreneur, and all my past jobs have allowed me to broaden my knowledge, skill sets, and creativity. The nutrition and dietetics field can be for anyone & the professional needs individuals from all backgrounds and expertise!

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